Carbon Monoxide Alarms

As of January 1, 2013, carbon monoxide (CO) alarms will be required in all residential dwelling units.

Approximately 250 people in the United States die each year from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. This deadly gas is hard to detect because it is odorless, colorless and tasteless.

As of January 1, 2013, carbon monoxide (CO) alarms will be required in all residential dwelling units. This applies even for dwellings that don’t have fireplaces or gas-fired appliances, because these are not the cause of the most severe incidents. Following a 2006 windstorm, 250 people were treated for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in the Puget Sound area and eight died, all from either burning charcoal briquettes inside their homes or from improper use of gasoline-powered generators. In response to these tragedies, new state-wide law and building codes require CO alarms in most residential buildings, including single-family homes.